A beginners's guide

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Producer

Games Producer questions and answers

Let’s tackle some common questions about this games career path.

Game producers organise the team that builds the game. They plan the game’s development schedule and communicate between development teams but also up to the people who pay for and market the game.

Producers tie the different elements of a game together, overseeing the delivery of work from the various teams, helping them hit deadlines and budgets. They prepare games for release by communicating with marketing and publishing teams, sometimes from other companies.

Assistant or Associate Producers help more senior producers with day to day project management. They are often responsible for filing elements of the game like artwork and demos for marketing, helping the developers perform and helping with budgets and expenditure. Starting salaries can range from between £22,000 to £25,000.

Senior producers are usually responsible for an entire game’s delivery including the game itself, but also how much is spent to develop it. They often find the money to develop the game in the first place, oversee testing the game at various stages, and manage the budgets and often contracts for the game. They also have the difficult task of giving developers feedback from testers, marketers and press. Salaries for medium to senior staff can range from between £30,000 to £60,000.

Producers can come from any background but usually they’re people who have organised other people to deliver complex projects. They usually don’t have portfolios to start with but they tend to be able to show their communications skills, their people management skills and often their marketing and financial skills too.

  • What’s a game producer?

    Game producers organise the team that builds the game. They plan the game’s development schedule and communicate between development teams but also up to the people who pay for and market the game.

  • What do they do?

    Producers tie the different elements of a game together, overseeing the delivery of work from the various teams, helping them hit deadlines and budgets. They prepare games for release by communicating with marketing and publishing teams, sometimes from other companies.

  • How do they start their careers?

    Assistant or Associate Producers help more senior producers with day to day project management. They are often responsible for filing elements of the game like artwork and demos for marketing, helping the developers perform and helping with budgets and expenditure. Starting salaries can range from between £22,000 to £25,000.

  • What about later in their careers?

    Senior producers are usually responsible for an entire game’s delivery including the game itself, but also how much is spent to develop it. They often find the money to develop the game in the first place, oversee testing the game at various stages, and manage the budgets and often contracts for the game. They also have the difficult task of giving developers feedback from testers, marketers and press. Salaries for medium to senior staff can range from between £30,000 to £60,000.

  • What skills and experience help them start their careers?

    Producers can come from any background but usually they’re people who have organised other people to deliver complex projects. They usually don’t have portfolios to start with but they tend to be able to show their communications skills, their people management skills and often their marketing and financial skills too.

What next?

8-11 year olds

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  1. Watch the role videos on our careers pages and ask which roles appeal the most
  2. Start making games on a free online course from the National Videogame Museum
  3. Take a Digital Schoolhouse computing workshop
  4. Attend a Games Careers Week event that’s right for the age group
  5. Find out if a Digital Schoolhouse is near you
  6. Keep playing and making games as much as possible in spare time

12-15 year olds

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  1. Watch the role videos on our careers pages and ask which roles appeal the most
  2. Take an introductory class on Gamemaker or Unity (see below)
  3. Attend a Games Careers Week event that’s right for the age group
  4. See if any Colleges or academies near you have games development courses like these from the NextGen Skills Academy
  5. Keep studying whichever of these GCSE subjects they enjoy: computer science, maths, art and design technology.

15-17 year olds

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  1. Watch the role videos on our careers pages and ask which roles appeal the most
  2. Take classes on Unreal, Gamemaker or Unity (see below)
  3. Attend a Games Careers Week event that’s right for the age group
  4. It’s not essential to have a degree but degree courses accredited by industry programmes like TIGA’s or ScreenSkills’ can improve career chances for graduates
  5. Keep studying whichever of these A level subjects are favourites: computer science, maths, art and design technology.
  6. Keep playing and making games as much as possible in spare time

18+ year olds

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  1. Research games roles through sites like Into Games, Grads in Games, British Esports Association and ScreenSkills
  2. Take BGI’s free Start your career in games development course on Futurelearn
  3. Teach yourself how to make games using any of the online courses below
  4. It’s not essential to have a degree but degree courses accredited by industry programmes like TIGA’s or ScreenSkills’ can improve career chances for graduates
  5. Attend a Games Careers Week event such as the Games Education Summit
  6. Attend an online games jam like these
  7. Build a portfolio of work, perhaps following advice from Grads in Games
  8. Find a games job via these job boards
  9. Keep playing and making games as much as possible in spare time

Essential resources

Below you will find a range of permanent resources running year round.

We have added age badges to guide you towards sites that have resources appropriate for the age group listed.

Parents – please note that our age badges are not certified age ratings so we recommend you review all materials to decide if they are appropriate for your child.

Essential resources

Below you will find a range of permanent resources running year round.

We have added age badges to guide you towards sites that have resources appropriate for the age group listed.

Parents – please note that our age badges are not certified age ratings so we recommend you review all materials to decide if they are appropriate for your child.

Games Careers Week is a free non-profit event organised and funded by the BGI, Into Games and Grads in Games, supported by TIGA, NextGen Skills Academy, Gamesindustry.biz and Ukie

Organised by

About the BGI
About the BGI

The BGI is a charity number 1183530 which educates the public about games through the National Videogame Museum, training and research.

About Into Games
About Into Games

Into Games is a national non-profit Community Interest Company that supports people from all backgrounds in finding rewarding careers in games.

About Grads for Games
About Grads for Games

Grads in Games is a non-profit Community Interest Company which equips students with the skills games employers need.

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